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Versatile Breastfeeding Dress: 1 Dress 5+ ways to wear.

1 Breastfeeding Dress 5+ Ways to Wear

Launching on March 25th: make sure you’re signed up to get your members only exclusive 20% off.

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Breastfeeding Dresses Launch

Breastfeeding Dresses are COMING SOON!

I’m a London based mama who is working very hard to make it easier for breastfeeding mummies to breastfeed freely + fearlessly anytime, anywhere.

I’ve an exclusive 20% off all dresses and first pick for mummies who show interest before the launch (March 25th) sign up here 👉🏾 SIGN UP !

Hope you love this as much as I do 💖🤱👗

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Your Positive Breastfeeding Stories: Charlotte

I have said time and again, that although we are lucky here in the UK to have help and advice regarding breastfeeding, it is still inconsistent and therefore ineffective. As we recently saw on the news, Public Health England suggests more needs to be done to help breastfeeding mums.

Today, I am speaking to new Mum, Charlotte who tells me that a lactation consultant suggested that her breastfeeding journey would have to come to an end after just six weeks! Six weeks!

I was induced 3 weeks early, given diamorphine in labour and forgotten about.. anyway by the time baby was born, she had been pressed against my pubic bone for hours so she had a keffel haematoma, a broken nose and two black eyes. She wouldn’t wake up at all for me to feed her. 12 hours later, still in maternity ward she still hadn’t latched. I hand expressed some colostrum and the midwife gave it to her in a syringe. She gave me some nipple shields and discharged me.

I took my baby home who still hadn’t woke to latch or cry and I couldn’t feed her. By 5am I messaged a breastfeeding consultant who came straight out to see me out of hours! 

She told me to express using an electric pump and give her a bottle as she hadn’t fed in 12 hours and was starting to look very jaundiced. She then attempted to latch her but it was impossible. She came out 3 times a day for a week and my baby wouldn’t latch, the pain was excruciating, her latch was so shallow and I would scream
So I would pump and bottle feed her every day but attempt to feed too without success. She was checked for tongue tie but didn’t have one.
I was so upset that I couldn’t feed and hated pumping, and then I got mastitis. I was in too much pain to feed so started completely bottle feeding. My consultant then showed me how to use my nipple shields and after a couple of weeks.  At six weeks old she finally latched on to a shield. Phew, right?
Wrong, because then she got bronchiolitis and wouldn’t feed at all. I managed to wean her off shields at ten weeks old with a lot of practice!
At a month old my lactation consultant told me I can successfully pump and should do so as she believed my breastfeeding journey come to an end. She explained a lot of women do this because unfortunately sometimes some women just can’t feed and she could seen how hard I was trying without luck.
But I had SO much determination and wouldn’t take no as an answer! I’m so glad I persevered and now I exclusively breastfeed my beautiful 5 month old girl.
YAY! How harrowing. How amazing. How blooming inspiring!
Mama, you can do the same, with the right support, knowledge and determination you can feed freely just like Charlotte!
A Word of Advice
Do the research for your specific issue, join groups (there’s thousands on facebook) and consult medical professionals, of course, just be aware that opinions often differ. To help others around you to be more supportive download our Free guide: Breastfeeding for Dada, which will help family members understand the breastfeeding process and why it is so important that they are calm and positive around you.
To learn more about using nipple shields here’s a post By Barbara Wilson Clay for Medela 
All the best Mama, all the best.
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How To Use Nipple Shields For Breastfeeding: Medela

Early latch-on problems are not unusual. For most mothers, breastfeeding takes a bit of practice! Most of the time, a little coaching from a skilled helper is all that is needed to get things going.

For difficult or persistent latch-on problems, many breastfeeding experts suggest the temporary use of a nipple shield. Made of thin, soft, silicone that doesn’t interfere with nipple stimulation, the Medela nipple shield is worn during breastfeeding. Holes at the tip allow milk to flow to the baby. A nipple shield may help protect breastfeeding when:

• The baby is premature, ill, or small. A nipple shield may make feeding easier for a small or weak baby. Because suction inside the nipple shield holds the nipple in an extended position, the baby can pause without ‘losing’ the nipple. Milk pools in the tip of the shield, and provides an immediate reward when the baby resumes suckling. Research shows that the milk intake of premature infants increases when a nipple shield is used. As the baby gains weight and matures, the shield becomes unnecessary.

• The mother has flat or inverted nipples. Some new mothers have nipple tissue that is not very stretchable. If it is difficult for the baby to draw in the mother’s nipple, the baby may pull away, cry, or simply fall asleep. The Medela nipple shield provides sensation deep in the mouth that stimulates the baby to keep sucking. As the milk begins to flow, the baby discovers that breastfeeding works! Over time, the mother’s nipples will become more pliable, and the shield is no longer needed to trigger the sucking reflex.

• The baby has had many bottles and now refuses the breast. Because the nipple shield feels similar to a bottle nipple, it can be used to coax a reluctant baby to accept the breast. Try this trick when the baby is not very hungry and the mother’s breasts are full. Drip a little expressed milk onto the top of the shield to moisten it. Drip milk into the corner of the baby’s mouth to reward the baby for trying. If the milk supply is low, an SNS™ taped under the shield can help provide an encouraging milk flow. Some babies need only a few sessions with a shield to return to full breastfeeding. Other will need more practice, or perhaps brief use of the shield at the beginning of each feed. Bottles can be decreased or discontinued as the baby becomes comfortable with nursing.

WHEN USING A NIPPLE SHIELD:

Correct latch is important.

Correct latch
Poor latch
Latch On series

A good latch is especially important when the mother is using a shield. The baby’s jaws must close on the breast, not out on the shaft of the nipple shield. Sucking only on the nipple pinches off the milk flow and fails to stimulate the milk supply. The baby will not get enough milk, and growth may be affected. It helps to have the baby’s latch evaluated by a trained Breastfeeding Specialist.

Cleaning the shield is important.

It is necessary to keep the nipple shield clean. Wash in hot soapy water and rinse in lots of hot water after each use. Boil once daily.

Choosing the correct size shield is important.

Chose the right size shield for the size of the baby’s mouth. If a shield is too big, the baby cannot adequately draw up the mother’s nipple, or may gag on the shield. The Newborn Small size shield is best for most small babies.. Medela makes several types of nipple shields, the Newborn Small, Newborn Regular, and Contact™ Nipple Shields in two sizes.

Protection of the milk supply is important.

Milk supply is controlled by how much milk the baby takes. A small, weak or poorly suckling baby may under-stimulate the milk supply. When using a nipple shield, it is important to pump after nursing to make sure the breasts are well emptied. Pumped milk can be used to supplement the baby. Pumping after feeding is necessary until it is clear that the milk supply is stable and the baby is growing well. We suggest a hospital quality pump such as the rented Symphony® or Lactina® breastpumps.

Nipple shields are devices that are used to help babies who are not yet breastfeeding normally. Medela suggests that mothers using nipple shields seek advice from a lactation consultant or other trained individual, as well as their physicians. Babies should have weight checks frequently to ensure baby’s health and good growth.


Helpful Hints:
Sit the shield on the nipple with the brim turned up like a hat. Then smooth down the edges. This will help the shield stick better. Moistening the edges will also hold it in place. Some mothers have larger nipples than the small shield can accommodate. Try the next largest size. However, observe carefully to see if this size works for the baby. A shield will not solve all problems, and sometimes other equipment may be appropriate.

WEANING OFF YOUR BABY FROM THE NIPPLE SHIELD:

The nipple shield is a tool to help solve a specific latch problems. They are not a substitute for experienced breastfeeding assistance. If you are using a nipple shield, we suggest that you keep in touch with your lactation professional and your physician as you work to breastfeed comfortably and effectively. The goal is to return to full breastfeeding with no need for special equipment. As the baby’s breastfeeding ability improves, remove the shield at various times during each feeding. If the baby seems unable to nurse without the shield, this means the problem is not yet resolved. Just keep practicing. So long as the baby is growing well, the continued use of the shield is not a major problem. If it appears that the baby could manage without the shield and is using it from habit, some mothers try spending a day in bed with the baby. Quiet time with increased skin-to-skin contact and frequent practicing will reassure the baby that he or she doesn’t really need the shield any more. Cutting away the tip of a silicone is not advised. The cut edges may irritate the baby’s mouth.

By Barbara Wilson Clay for Medela 

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Breastfeeding is Picking Up Traction

On any given day you might sit at your laptop, type in breastfeeding, because why not, and you’ll see a whole range of posts dated 2017, 2014, 2012!

However, in 2018 breastfeeding seems to be gaining traction in the UK media. Which is just fabulous!

I have given GAP my standing ovation for their new breastfeeding advert. I have joined in the conversation with the Loose Women Ladies and thanked ITV news for picking up the conversation on breastfeeding, all while creating some unique breastfeeding clothes for my beautiful customers!

I’m happy 😃

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Breastfeeding Advert Of The Year: GAP

Gap has been applauded, commended and given a standing ovation (by me, Chaneen Saliee) for their beautiful breastfeeding advert!

The last time we saw a hint about breastfeeding in an advertisement it was a negative depiction, which is always all to common regarding his the topic of breastfeeding! Dove, for some reason thought it necessary to support those that opposed breastfeeding in public!

One advert says “75% say breastfeeding in public is fine, 25% say put them away. What’s your way?”

25% of who? Because no one asked me.

But that malarkey is so last year, so 2017!

This year, we can proudly celebrate another step towards normalising breastfeeding! Thank you GAP.

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You Do Have Enough Milk…

Let’s learn how to increase that milk supply when it’s low!

If you are a mama who wants to breastfeed her baby (and I think this should apply to every mother capable of breastfeeding – controversial?🤷🏾‍♀️) and you’re worried that you’re not producing enough milk, fear not… read on and learn how to be enough, because you are enough.

As you may, or may not, already know breastfeeding works via supply and demand, which means the more milk is called for, the more it will flow, the less often milk is called the less milk you will produce.

And that there is the key to boosting your supply! 🔑

The moment you use a formula replacement there is no demand being met and therefore your breast will not produce milk. So supplements are not the answer!

So it’s better to be patient, dedicate yourself to the process, let baby suckle for as long as he need, heck – even though they tell you not to, let him suckle while he falls asleep, this will help to produce an abundance of milk which you can pump/express.

There are also a range of recipes; cookies and brownies (YUM), designed to help boost your milk supply. Check out @themilkbooster_ on Instagram or at www.themilkbooster.eu.

It’s important to know and understand the different ways that baby’s feed. It’s normal for baby’s to feed, and be fussy after a feed. They seem to want to feed all the time: they’re not starving, they’re cluster feeding. I’ll write a post about this soon, but for now, simply Google it.

It is also a good idea to contact a lactation consultant. They will be able to assess you situation and give you advice specific to you and your baby.

Finally, get support – ask for it, demand it, find it! There’s such a wealth of breastfeeding support on line and via several organisations. Ask your GP for a list of your local organisations. We have a guide called Breastfeeding for Dada, which explains why support is so important and how Dad and other family members can be supportive, especially when you may face situations when you feel anxious about your milk supply! Download it here.

Get in touch, I will be happy to get behind you and cheer you on @chicanddiscreet!

All the best, Mama, all the best!

Chaneen x

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To Breastfeed or not to Breastfeed?

Not every mum has access to information about the importance of breastfeeding. To be frank, the information most readily available to most of us is utter pish-posh. I say this because some doctors say breastfeed, and others say, all too freely, your baby needs cows milk.

Only in a few cases does a baby ‘need’ cows milk. Now, I don’t claim to be an expert but I’ve done my share of research and I have read over and over again that there are a few medical scenarios in which a baby ‘needs’ cows milk, (that’s formula by the way):

– if the mother has HIV/AIDS

– if the mother has had a double mastectomy

– if the mother is seriously ill and/or is on any medication that could be toxic to the baby through the breastmilk

– if the mother is undergoing radiation treatment, which can affect the breastmilk

– if the baby was born before 32 weeks (this is a temporary need, the mother can mix feed and then breastfeed exclusively if she wishes)

– if the baby has Galactosemia, a rare metabolic genetic disorder (in this case all forms of milk are to be avoided)

If none of the above are applicable, then breast is best, any difficulties can be smoothed out with patience and perseverance.

Formula milk does not and cannot replace the benefits of breastmilk. I mean, a baby will be full up instead of hungry, but they are not protected from illnesses and diseases like they would be if they were breastfed.

Seek advice and further information before you decide to move on to formula.

I leave you with this… formula cows milk is an artificial milk created to support families with the problems mentioned above. Formula was designed to be used when it is medically needed.

In you case, is it? Is it medically needed?

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Should Crying Babies Be Banned From Cafes?

This morning I sat and watched this morning. There was a story entitled ‘Should crying babies be banned from cafes?”

What nonsense kind of question is that? I thought as I turned the volume up, in preparation to hate every single word I heard. I have to admit, it was a mix of opinions.

And Tonight I felt so compelled to respond. Hypothetically speaking:

Jane snuggles in a corner in a cafe; actually, let’s call it a coffee shop, it’s more Jane’s style. She’s tired and hungry and incredibly tired. She yawns and pulls her coffee cup, almost off the table but when she realises, she exclaims something nonsensical, gathers her thoughts and brings her cup to her mouth.

Mmm… she is so grateful for the this cafe, it’s literally downstairs and around the corner from home and they serve the best coffee. She doesn’t quite come here everyday, but she comes often enough. She’s new, to the area that is and to motherhood, but not to cafes, I mean, coffee shops.

Today, outside, it’s freezing, and of course it would be it’s February in London. The sounds of the rain battering the windows makes today’s visit extra special. I mean who doesn’t love the feeling of being nice, warm and cosy while the storm rages on outside?

Anyway, we are way off. Jane sips her warm coffee in peace for a while. But then, she’s ripped out from her moments of silence and sonder by the piercing cry of her 3 month old baby, who had been awake for a total of 3 minutes and 22 seconds without any attention. He decided that he didn’t like that much. He was hungry and mama had to know about it.

She smiled at him, for she was happy that he was awake. She often missed him when he slept and wanted to wake him up always. She smiled and did not notice the stares. If looks could kill, she’d have died with a knife in her back. She prepped herself for his feed and lifted baby up out of his pram.

Now, if her fellow patrons were bewildered by the sound of a crying baby, they were irate at said baby’s mother’s audacity to feed, breastfeed, him so publicly.

A single knife? I was being kind. These looks and stares would equate to the contents of a tool box. Still, Jane, so innocent and so sweet, would not have noticed if it was not for the balding fat man’s statement.

“For goodness sake, do you have to be so blatant? It’s rude and disgusting!”

He was sat right next to her, but he got up a walked to another table.

Poor Jane. A dagger to her heart. I know, nobody says dagger anymore, but it just sounded more… poetic than knife.

Jane looked around for someone to affirm her decision to feed her child in this way. She saw several people looking away on purpose; an older woman nodding to the balding man in agreement and a barista shaking his head and looking at no one in particular.

She was stung, she continued to feed, but she couldn’t help but feel awkward and uncomfortable. She pulled baby off, as soon as she could, shoved him back in his pram, cursed at the too short buckles, whipped her bag on and darted of into the rain.

The next time Jane visited a cafe, her little boy was four months old. She’d been working on building up her confidence again after the … incident.

She’d agreed to meet up with a friend, because by herself it was all too much. She packed a pouch of puréed food, just in case baby got hungry.

Luckily for her, he slept for most of the meet up. It was nice, she drank coffee, chatted and took some photos. It had been a while since she had met John, and it was even more exciting because he was having a baby soon too. She shared with him all of her tips, tricks, highs but not lows. She didn’t want to remember that day let alone talk about it.

Once again, baby awake and hungry begun to cry. I say cry, unfortunately though, this baby did more of a screech. Of course mama had learned her lesson from the first time; she took out the puréed bananas and offered it to baby.

His little lips bunch up and created a small O. The food reappeared, slowly, followed by his little tongue. He’d pushed it out and was enraged so he cried even louder.

Jane tried the bananas again. This time he wailed with the food sitting just under his tongue.

Jane looked at her friend John and told him she needed to go home. He scrunched up his eyebrows, “but I thought you were breastfeeding?”

She paused for a second. She was still breastfeeding, but surely she couldn’t be so rude and disgusting? Not again.

She looked around. It was a different cafe, coffee shop. The customers were a lot younger and perhaps more tolerant of the idea. Maybe?

However tolerant they may have been of breastfeeding in public we, not Jane, shall never find out. Because what happened next was an act so cruel, rude and disgusting – according to John that is.

A youngish, tanned girl, in a black apron walked over to Jane with the biggest smile on her face. It was a fake smile, just so we are clear.

She bent down to Jane… or to the child? It had to be the child because surely, no one, no one could be so patronising. And told her to get out of the shop immediately.

And although she didn’t quite say that, it felt that way to Jane, and to John.

What she did say though was that people were complaining about the baby’s crying and that Jane should do something about it so as to be considerate. She also said she didn’t mind watching Jane’s things while she stepped outside, if she needed.

Jane said she was sorry to John, sobbed a little while she ran out of the cafe. John chased after her and cussed about the a******* in the coffee shop and he walked her home. The baby, the star of the show, fell asleep on the short walk home,making everything seem pointless.

Jane spent the rest of the day, and the week and perhaps the next few months inside the house.

She resurfaced when she stopped feeding baby at six months. She looked so grateful for the light of the sun. She explained over coffee, with John’s wife Mary, that although she had hoped to breastfeed for a year, she was pleased that she was able to get back out and about without worrying.

Of course, Mary, who was due to have her baby any day now, took on this worry. Goodness knows whether she went on to breastfeed at all.

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How to Breastfeed Like a Pro from Day One

So you’re about to have a new baby, or you’ve already done that. You’ve decided that you want to breastfeed because why wouldn’t you and now you just need to figure out how to do this thing.

Breastfeeding is a journey, somewhat like pregnancy and it’s something that you’ll have to learn to do well.


“It’s all about the latch”

The Breast Crawl

Did you know that a newborn baby, who is placed on his mother’s abdomen right after birth, can crawl up to his mother’s breast and latch on himself?

Don’t believe me? Check out this video: https://youtu.be/0OYXd-mMSVU

Wow! Exactly. Unfortunately however, most newborns and mothers aren’t given the chance to experience this practice here in the UK.

But the point is, if a baby can do that right right out of the womb, breastfeeding is one of the most natural and instinctual things on this planet.

It’s all about the latch, get that right early on and the rest will fall into place.

The best way to get a good latch is to ensure that baby’s nose is in line with your nipple. That way baby can smell and sense where the food is and it means that he has to open his mouth really really wide before he gets what he wants.

Don’t feel tempted to ‘help him out’.

As tempting as in may be to ‘help baby out’ it can actually do more harm than good. As I’ve already said, newborns are more than capable of crawling and climbing to their source of food. (If you still don’t believe me, you haven’t watched the video and I really think you should!)

Similarly, a baby is more than capable to open his mouth wide wide wide enough to get the food.

The problem with helping them out is that you may place your nipple inside their mouth which is not open wide enough. This is what causes many women pain because their nipple is caught under the hard roof of baby’s mouth instead of the soft part at the back.

Once baby latches on properly, it should be pain free and you should be able to see and /or hear baby swallowing. This often follows a rhythmic pattern (suck suck suck swallow- suck suck suck swallow).

If it is painful or it appears baby is suck suck suck – suck suck sucking without swallowing, you will have to try again.

Practice this from day one with the support of your friends and family, which is vital for oxytocin and building up milk supply. Click here to check out our Breastfeeding for Dada: a guide to breastfeeding for fathers for more info on this topic.

Most importantly, don’t worry if you don’t get the right straight away, it can take weeks to get a good latch. Just do not give up in a hurry! Because even though you might experience frustration and discomfort your perseverance will be the best thing you can do for you baby and the great effect can last up to 14 years of not longer.


Knowledge is key!

Do lots of research online and with real life cases (women you know who are qualified or who have had children), it helps.

Here are some well respected sources:

http://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/breastfeeding-first-days/

https://www.babycenter.com/breastfeeding

http://m.kidshealth.org/en/parents/breast-bottle-feeding.html?WT.ac=

You, like billions and trillions of women before you, are well equipped to do this!

All the best.

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Breastfeeding For the Fathers: TOP TEN TIPS

be the best dad there is

New-Fatherhood is on the horizon and you want to get it right! Many father’s find it difficult to bond with their new baby or new family in the early days. A lot of that is due to their lack of engagement and/or confidence.

So we’ve compiled a list of our top ten tips for new dads of breastfed babies. This list and our guide will help you to feel involved in the breastfeeding process. AND, and, and ultimately help you to have a better bonding experience with your new family.

All the best!


Here’s our top tips:

 

  1. Tell her she is doing an AMAZING job
  2. Get her food, snacks and drinks
  3. Make sure she eats healthily and stays hydrated
  4. Get her pillows and arm rests
  5. Ask her what she would like for you to do
  6. Burp the baby
  7. Get up with her for night feeds
  8. Encourage her to continue in times of worry
  9. Get her out of the house (and support her with our Breastfeeding in Public Survival Guide)
  10. Help with her confidence, get her some breastfeeding friendly clothes.

Each step in this list will help your family so much in the early stages. It’s important that you establish a healthy breastfeeding relationship from early on to ensure a happy and healthy baby.

 We’ve created a quick and easy 15 page guide with lots of white space and only the most vital information. It’s all about breastfeeding, and being a supportive Dada!

Click here to get your free guide!

 

FATHER BF IMAGE.png

You’ll be grateful to have had it sent to you.

Click here to access your FREE guide!

As an aside: I do endorse my breastfeeding tees and other freebies a little, of course, but really it’s all about the baby. And it’s only the last two pages.

All the best.