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You Do Have Enough Milk…

Let’s learn how to increase that milk supply when it’s low!

If you are a mama who wants to breastfeed her baby (and I think this should apply to every mother capable of breastfeeding – controversial?🤷🏾‍♀️) and you’re worried that you’re not producing enough milk, fear not… read on and learn how to be enough, because you are enough.

As you may, or may not, already know breastfeeding works via supply and demand, which means the more milk is called for, the more it will flow, the less often milk is called the less milk you will produce.

And that there is the key to boosting your supply! 🔑

The moment you use a formula replacement there is no demand being met and therefore your breast will not produce milk. So supplements are not the answer!

So it’s better to be patient, dedicate yourself to the process, let baby suckle for as long as he need, heck – even though they tell you not to, let him suckle while he falls asleep, this will help to produce an abundance of milk which you can pump/express.

There are also a range of recipes; cookies and brownies (YUM), designed to help boost your milk supply. Check out @themilkbooster_ on Instagram or at www.themilkbooster.eu.

It’s important to know and understand the different ways that baby’s feed. It’s normal for baby’s to feed, and be fussy after a feed. They seem to want to feed all the time: they’re not starving, they’re cluster feeding. I’ll write a post about this soon, but for now, simply Google it.

It is also a good idea to contact a lactation consultant. They will be able to assess you situation and give you advice specific to you and your baby.

Finally, get support – ask for it, demand it, find it! There’s such a wealth of breastfeeding support on line and via several organisations. Ask your GP for a list of your local organisations. We have a guide called Breastfeeding for Dada, which explains why support is so important and how Dad and other family members can be supportive, especially when you may face situations when you feel anxious about your milk supply! Download it here.

Get in touch, I will be happy to get behind you and cheer you on @chicanddiscreet!

All the best, Mama, all the best!

Chaneen x

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To Breastfeed or not to Breastfeed?

Not every mum has access to information about the importance of breastfeeding. To be frank, the information most readily available to most of us is utter pish-posh. I say this because some doctors say breastfeed, and others say, all too freely, your baby needs cows milk.

Only in a few cases does a baby ‘need’ cows milk. Now, I don’t claim to be an expert but I’ve done my share of research and I have read over and over again that there are a few medical scenarios in which a baby ‘needs’ cows milk, (that’s formula by the way):

– if the mother has HIV/AIDS

– if the mother has had a double mastectomy

– if the mother is seriously ill and/or is on any medication that could be toxic to the baby through the breastmilk

– if the mother is undergoing radiation treatment, which can affect the breastmilk

– if the baby was born before 32 weeks (this is a temporary need, the mother can mix feed and then breastfeed exclusively if she wishes)

– if the baby has Galactosemia, a rare metabolic genetic disorder (in this case all forms of milk are to be avoided)

If none of the above are applicable, then breast is best, any difficulties can be smoothed out with patience and perseverance.

Formula milk does not and cannot replace the benefits of breastmilk. I mean, a baby will be full up instead of hungry, but they are not protected from illnesses and diseases like they would be if they were breastfed.

Seek advice and further information before you decide to move on to formula.

I leave you with this… formula cows milk is an artificial milk created to support families with the problems mentioned above. Formula was designed to be used when it is medically needed.

In you case, is it? Is it medically needed?

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Should Crying Babies Be Banned From Cafes?

This morning I sat and watched this morning. There was a story entitled ‘Should crying babies be banned from cafes?”

What nonsense kind of question is that? I thought as I turned the volume up, in preparation to hate every single word I heard. I have to admit, it was a mix of opinions.

And Tonight I felt so compelled to respond. Hypothetically speaking:

Jane snuggles in a corner in a cafe; actually, let’s call it a coffee shop, it’s more Jane’s style. She’s tired and hungry and incredibly tired. She yawns and pulls her coffee cup, almost off the table but when she realises, she exclaims something nonsensical, gathers her thoughts and brings her cup to her mouth.

Mmm… she is so grateful for the this cafe, it’s literally downstairs and around the corner from home and they serve the best coffee. She doesn’t quite come here everyday, but she comes often enough. She’s new, to the area that is and to motherhood, but not to cafes, I mean, coffee shops.

Today, outside, it’s freezing, and of course it would be it’s February in London. The sounds of the rain battering the windows makes today’s visit extra special. I mean who doesn’t love the feeling of being nice, warm and cosy while the storm rages on outside?

Anyway, we are way off. Jane sips her warm coffee in peace for a while. But then, she’s ripped out from her moments of silence and sonder by the piercing cry of her 3 month old baby, who had been awake for a total of 3 minutes and 22 seconds without any attention. He decided that he didn’t like that much. He was hungry and mama had to know about it.

She smiled at him, for she was happy that he was awake. She often missed him when he slept and wanted to wake him up always. She smiled and did not notice the stares. If looks could kill, she’d have died with a knife in her back. She prepped herself for his feed and lifted baby up out of his pram.

Now, if her fellow patrons were bewildered by the sound of a crying baby, they were irate at said baby’s mother’s audacity to feed, breastfeed, him so publicly.

A single knife? I was being kind. These looks and stares would equate to the contents of a tool box. Still, Jane, so innocent and so sweet, would not have noticed if it was not for the balding fat man’s statement.

“For goodness sake, do you have to be so blatant? It’s rude and disgusting!”

He was sat right next to her, but he got up a walked to another table.

Poor Jane. A dagger to her heart. I know, nobody says dagger anymore, but it just sounded more… poetic than knife.

Jane looked around for someone to affirm her decision to feed her child in this way. She saw several people looking away on purpose; an older woman nodding to the balding man in agreement and a barista shaking his head and looking at no one in particular.

She was stung, she continued to feed, but she couldn’t help but feel awkward and uncomfortable. She pulled baby off, as soon as she could, shoved him back in his pram, cursed at the too short buckles, whipped her bag on and darted of into the rain.

The next time Jane visited a cafe, her little boy was four months old. She’d been working on building up her confidence again after the … incident.

She’d agreed to meet up with a friend, because by herself it was all too much. She packed a pouch of puréed food, just in case baby got hungry.

Luckily for her, he slept for most of the meet up. It was nice, she drank coffee, chatted and took some photos. It had been a while since she had met John, and it was even more exciting because he was having a baby soon too. She shared with him all of her tips, tricks, highs but not lows. She didn’t want to remember that day let alone talk about it.

Once again, baby awake and hungry begun to cry. I say cry, unfortunately though, this baby did more of a screech. Of course mama had learned her lesson from the first time; she took out the puréed bananas and offered it to baby.

His little lips bunch up and created a small O. The food reappeared, slowly, followed by his little tongue. He’d pushed it out and was enraged so he cried even louder.

Jane tried the bananas again. This time he wailed with the food sitting just under his tongue.

Jane looked at her friend John and told him she needed to go home. He scrunched up his eyebrows, “but I thought you were breastfeeding?”

She paused for a second. She was still breastfeeding, but surely she couldn’t be so rude and disgusting? Not again.

She looked around. It was a different cafe, coffee shop. The customers were a lot younger and perhaps more tolerant of the idea. Maybe?

However tolerant they may have been of breastfeeding in public we, not Jane, shall never find out. Because what happened next was an act so cruel, rude and disgusting – according to John that is.

A youngish, tanned girl, in a black apron walked over to Jane with the biggest smile on her face. It was a fake smile, just so we are clear.

She bent down to Jane… or to the child? It had to be the child because surely, no one, no one could be so patronising. And told her to get out of the shop immediately.

And although she didn’t quite say that, it felt that way to Jane, and to John.

What she did say though was that people were complaining about the baby’s crying and that Jane should do something about it so as to be considerate. She also said she didn’t mind watching Jane’s things while she stepped outside, if she needed.

Jane said she was sorry to John, sobbed a little while she ran out of the cafe. John chased after her and cussed about the a******* in the coffee shop and he walked her home. The baby, the star of the show, fell asleep on the short walk home,making everything seem pointless.

Jane spent the rest of the day, and the week and perhaps the next few months inside the house.

She resurfaced when she stopped feeding baby at six months. She looked so grateful for the light of the sun. She explained over coffee, with John’s wife Mary, that although she had hoped to breastfeed for a year, she was pleased that she was able to get back out and about without worrying.

Of course, Mary, who was due to have her baby any day now, took on this worry. Goodness knows whether she went on to breastfeed at all.

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How to Breastfeed Like a Pro from Day One

So you’re about to have a new baby, or you’ve already done that. You’ve decided that you want to breastfeed because why wouldn’t you and now you just need to figure out how to do this thing.

Breastfeeding is a journey, somewhat like pregnancy and it’s something that you’ll have to learn to do well.


“It’s all about the latch”

The Breast Crawl

Did you know that a newborn baby, who is placed on his mother’s abdomen right after birth, can crawl up to his mother’s breast and latch on himself?

Don’t believe me? Check out this video: https://youtu.be/0OYXd-mMSVU

Wow! Exactly. Unfortunately however, most newborns and mothers aren’t given the chance to experience this practice here in the UK.

But the point is, if a baby can do that right right out of the womb, breastfeeding is one of the most natural and instinctual things on this planet.

It’s all about the latch, get that right early on and the rest will fall into place.

The best way to get a good latch is to ensure that baby’s nose is in line with your nipple. That way baby can smell and sense where the food is and it means that he has to open his mouth really really wide before he gets what he wants.

Don’t feel tempted to ‘help him out’.

As tempting as in may be to ‘help baby out’ it can actually do more harm than good. As I’ve already said, newborns are more than capable of crawling and climbing to their source of food. (If you still don’t believe me, you haven’t watched the video and I really think you should!)

Similarly, a baby is more than capable to open his mouth wide wide wide enough to get the food.

The problem with helping them out is that you may place your nipple inside their mouth which is not open wide enough. This is what causes many women pain because their nipple is caught under the hard roof of baby’s mouth instead of the soft part at the back.

Once baby latches on properly, it should be pain free and you should be able to see and /or hear baby swallowing. This often follows a rhythmic pattern (suck suck suck swallow- suck suck suck swallow).

If it is painful or it appears baby is suck suck suck – suck suck sucking without swallowing, you will have to try again.

Practice this from day one with the support of your friends and family, which is vital for oxytocin and building up milk supply. Click here to check out our Breastfeeding for Dada: a guide to breastfeeding for fathers for more info on this topic.

Most importantly, don’t worry if you don’t get the right straight away, it can take weeks to get a good latch. Just do not give up in a hurry! Because even though you might experience frustration and discomfort your perseverance will be the best thing you can do for you baby and the great effect can last up to 14 years of not longer.


Knowledge is key!

Do lots of research online and with real life cases (women you know who are qualified or who have had children), it helps.

Here are some well respected sources:

http://www.who.int/topics/breastfeeding/en/

https://www.nhs.uk/conditions/pregnancy-and-baby/breastfeeding-first-days/

https://www.babycenter.com/breastfeeding

http://m.kidshealth.org/en/parents/breast-bottle-feeding.html?WT.ac=

You, like billions and trillions of women before you, are well equipped to do this!

All the best.

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Breastfeeding For the Fathers: TOP TEN TIPS

be the best dad there is

New-Fatherhood is on the horizon and you want to get it right! Many father’s find it difficult to bond with their new baby or new family in the early days. A lot of that is due to their lack of engagement and/or confidence.

So we’ve compiled a list of our top ten tips for new dads of breastfed babies. This list and our guide will help you to feel involved in the breastfeeding process. AND, and, and ultimately help you to have a better bonding experience with your new family.

All the best!


Here’s our top tips:

 

  1. Tell her she is doing an AMAZING job
  2. Get her food, snacks and drinks
  3. Make sure she eats healthily and stays hydrated
  4. Get her pillows and arm rests
  5. Ask her what she would like for you to do
  6. Burp the baby
  7. Get up with her for night feeds
  8. Encourage her to continue in times of worry
  9. Get her out of the house (and support her with our Breastfeeding in Public Survival Guide)
  10. Help with her confidence, get her some breastfeeding friendly clothes.

Each step in this list will help your family so much in the early stages. It’s important that you establish a healthy breastfeeding relationship from early on to ensure a happy and healthy baby.

 We’ve created a quick and easy 15 page guide with lots of white space and only the most vital information. It’s all about breastfeeding, and being a supportive Dada!

Click here to get your free guide!

 

FATHER BF IMAGE.png

You’ll be grateful to have had it sent to you.

Click here to access your FREE guide!

As an aside: I do endorse my breastfeeding tees and other freebies a little, of course, but really it’s all about the baby. And it’s only the last two pages.

All the best.

 

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Yes, you SHOULD breastfeed for as long as possible!

Come, come… I’ve got a secret to tell you!

“No matter what they tell you… Breast is Best!”

Everything else comes second!

Now, here’s 5 reasons for why that’s true….

1. It is Recommended For Use When Medically Necessary

Artificial baby milk, also known as formula, is created to ensure that babies with no access to breast milk could eat! Because after all, fed is best! 😉 It was not created to replace breast milk for the sake of replacing breast milk!

The best way I’ve heard it put is like this:

 The first rule of lactation is feed the baby. The second rule is  protect the mother’s breast milk supply.  If we do not have breast milk available, then we use formula if it is medically necessary. The issue is that most of the time, it is not medically necessary.

-BFCAA

You wouldn’t give your baby other artificial supplements if you could help it, so why start with formula when it’s not necessary?!

Exclusive Breastfeeding is advised for at least the first 6 Months unless the following are true for you:

  • Your baby was born before 32 weeks
  • You baby has an extremely low birth weight (mixed feeding is necessary for a while).
  • You have HIV
  • You baby needs special dietary needs
  • You have or have had breast cancer


2. It Can Prevent Newborn Illness

Newborn babies have weak immune systems and they can get sick very fast. When a newborn baby does develop an infection, it can become a great cause for concern.   If a doctor suspects that a newborn baby has an infection, he will begin antibiotic treatment right away.

BUT you can prevent this!

Breast milk builds up a baby’s immune system MASSIVELY! Which means the baby that gets the milk, beats viral, bacterial and parasitic infections so much more easily than the baby that doesn’t get the milk. #WINNING!


3. It Can Save You Money

The cost of formula feeding a baby of course varies from family to family. but on average breastfeeding can save you anywhere between £2,000 to £4,000 per year! Let’s put that another way! Formula feeding will cost you an EXTRA £2,000 to £4,000 per year! 

That’s in ADDITION to the cost of clothes, nappies, toys, food (when they move on after 6 months) and other necessary equipment!


4. It Inspires Other Mothers

Here’s one you may have not heard of before! Breastfeeding helps to inspire other mothers to do that same!

It’s true that most mothers want to breastfeed but either they don’t have the support that they need or they don’t feel comfortable doing so.

Seeing another mother feed their baby so freely, will make them feel more comfortable to do the same. This is particularly true for feeding on public! Check out The Breastfeeding in Public Survival Guide here for some tips on feeding comfortably in public!

In this scenario, you’re not only helping your baby but you helping other families to benefit from the awesomeness of breastfeeding and breast milk!


5. Lose Weight With So Little Effort

If I describe breastfeeding in the early days as something which requires such little effort I’d be a liar. But once you’ve gotten the hang of it you’ll be reaping the benefits for months and years to come!

For a lot of women in the West, weight gain during pregnancy is daunting! Which means that weight loss is an inevitable endeavour once the baby is out!

Now, most doctors prescribe rest from exercise for the first 6 weeks after a natural delivery and longer after a c-section. But, with breastfeeding you don’t have to wait a single minute before you can start to get rid of any extra weight.

Within the first 60 minutes you are advised to and, thankfully, assisted in, feeding your baby breast milk.

“Breast milk contains 20 calories per ounce, so if you feed your baby 20 ounces a day, that’s 400 calories you’ve swept right out of your body.”Hurrah!

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What to Say if Someone Criticizes your Breastfeeding in Public.

There are a number of criticisms that you may hear or have heard (even if just through the grape vine) in regards to breastfeeding in public!

Here are a few responses you may have:

  1. “It’s normal, breasts were created to produce milk, so that the woman can feed her young. I mean, scientifically…”

  2.   “F*** you! Get over it, you p****!”

  3. “Oh, deary was I…, golly, no, I did not meant to offend you! I’ll just pop them away.”

  4. You may have these responses, but I do not recommend them!

For one you need not explain your why to anyone. It is literally none of their business because The Breastfeeding Police do no exist.

Secondly, negativity and aggression met with negativity and aggression won’t end well. And we are all about the feel good factor!

And lastly, nobody likes a push over and if you take this approach too often it’s likely you’ll stop breastfeeding sooner than you planned. Don’t let them win.

The best thing for you and your baby is to continue your breastfeeding practices for as long as possible. The best thing for you to do should you find yourself in a situation criticism or hostility is to remain calm and issue your response assertively. 

Simply say:

“I’m protected by  the 2010 UK Equality Act: a law which bans unfair treatment. If you wish to continue to verbally harass me we can take this further legally.”

Or hand them one of our: STOP, I’m Free to Feed cards! Click here for a free download!

KNOW YOUR RIGHTS!

You are entitled to feed freely in public in the UK. If you are not in the UK check which laws your are protected by.

 Be Brave, Mama!

Feed Freely!

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Wine For The Pregnant and The Nursing Mamas

Do you like wine?

I’m sure you do, because who doesn’t.

I have not had an alcoholic beverage for the best part of a year maybe even more than that. But it’s Christmas time again and this Christmas I wanted to join in with the festivities: eat, drink and be merry. So I went on a hunt to find a wine I can drink while being a breastfeeding mama.

Initially I felt like I had no hope because I didn’t think there be a Y not there for me to drink as a breastfeeding women and because I am so adamant I want to breastfeed exclusively from the breast I sort of made up in my mind I wasn’t gonna have a drink I wouldn’t have any wine. I am more of a spirit drinker to be honest I love my gin and tonic I love a good whiskey and Coke but I can settle for a wank because I don’t think there’s any books bring a spirit out there with a girl.

The first time ever came across a non-alcoholic wine was when I was in college and a friend and I went out intentionally to get a little bit tipsy or should I say drunk because in the UK that’s what you do. At the time we were college students and we had very little money so we wanted to buy the cheapest wine that was on the market.

We spent a grand total of 3 pounds. Twice. Before we realised the alcohol content was zero. At the time I was incredibly disappointed and frustrated because I had ‘wasted’ all of £6. But now I am very grateful for that experience because memory serves me well and I can use that experience to cater for my present situation, I can drink wine as a breastfeeding mama! Yay.

FRE offers a range of Non-Alcoholic / Alcohol Removed Wine and Champagne

These FRE Wines were from Asda.

  • Fre White Zinfandel Rosé £2.98
  • Fre Chardonnay £2.98

http://www.frewines.com/shop

Some Other Alcohol Free Wines are

Eisberg Carbernet Red: £3.50 TESCO

BEES KNEES SPARKLING ROSE: £3.50, MORRISONS

Romance en Blanc Organic White: £7.99 Alcoholfree.co.uk

 

Happy Holidays x

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Breastfeeding or Formula feeding, what’s best for my baby?

No matter what any one tells you, breast is best!

Breast milk is best for you and your baby, and the benefits of breastfeeding extend well beyond basic nutrition. In addition to containing all the vitamins and nutrients your baby needs in the first six months of life, breast milk is packed with disease-fighting substances that protect your baby from illness.

breast feeding vs formula

I have been labeled somewhat of a breastfeeding fanatic. I prefer the term breastfeeding advocate. I never thought much about breastfeeding before I was pregnant, nor did I think much about it while I was pregnant. But now I’m with my baby girl, there’s nothing I’d rather do.

I’m not necessarily a wholesome and super health conscious type of person. But I do what I can… and since breast milk is the super food of the year, no, of the century (and far beyond)…  I hope to extend this breastfeeding journey for as long as possible.

So, if you have the choice, choose breast milk!

breastfeeding myths